Lake Chicot – Best Seen by Canoe

My experience with swamps is fairly succinct:  When I was in 8th grade we took a class trip that included a jaunt down to the Okefenokee Swamp.  A brief raft ride, some pointing at alligators, and I think someone may have drank the swamp water after the guide assured us it was cleaner than it looked.

And that’s been it really.  As such, I think I should be forgiven for expecting to do any hiking in the vicinity of a lake swamp in Louisiana.

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A Stroll Through the Bayou…in Arkansas

I’ve gone my whole life without ever setting foot, driving through, or really knowing anything about Arkansas.  It turns out that the south western bit of Arkansas is a lot like the two states it borders: Texas and Louisiana.  Sort of a hybrid really…pine forests with swampy bits rather than the dense pine forests of Texas or the swamps of Louisiana.

Our walk (I can’t call it a hike because it was short enough to not bring our packs) took us through the woods around Millwood Lake in Millwood State Park.  The path was mostly submerged.  If you’re not into waterproof shoes – this hike might make you reconsider.

As I am already a waterproof mid-height hiking boot wearing kind of guy I was able to take it in stride.

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Climbing Lascar – The Most Active Volcano in Northern Chile

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Lascar is in the center. Click image to enlarge. This is from the Salar de Atacama salt flats.

If you ever find yourself in the San Pedro de Atacama area of Chile, Lascar will prove to be an easy volcano to spot.  Its not the famously conical shaped one that everyone takes pictures of, that one is Licancabur.*   Lascar is the flat topped volcano streaked with white.  The white streaks aren’t snow (most of the time…occasionally it snows too) but are sulfur deposits.  Also, on most mornings you can see a small cloud over Lascar, due to the fact that Lascar is an active volcano.

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Licancabur – very symmetrical. Not very climbable, what with the landmines…

Not only is Lascar active, it is the most active volcano in Northern Chile.  Its volcanism is the cause of one of the strangest climbing difficulties I’ve ever heard of: toxic clouds of sulfur.  If the wind is coming from across the crater the hike can get very unpleasant.  It is sometimes so bad that the hike can’t be accomplished.

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Hiking Devils Canyon

Sometimes I would like to have the opportunity to meet the individual responsible for naming places.  Some names have history, others describe appearances or animals you might happen across (looking at you Golden Warbler Trails in Texas).

And then there are names like Devils Canyon.  Obviously the namer thought of this name before he saw the canyon and was just itching to put it to a canyon, any canyon probably.  Is there much devilish about this place?  Well, its hot.  Even in late March it can approach miserable.  This is a place I would advise against hiking in high summer.  Or at least doing so in the early morning, with lots of water and a hat.

Devils Canyon as best as I can discern is but one of a series of canyons near the Colorado National Monument.  As it is near but not in the Monument it is free!  Yay!

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Copa Coya: The Greatest Hike Ever?

Earlier this year I had the opportunity to travel to the Atacama Desert in Chile.  Many hikes were had.  Many were awesome.  This one was probably the most awesome.

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Copa Coya is an almost volcano.  It tried, but never quite made it.  Evidence of its attempt include geothermal springs and geysers nearby.  If you’re touring the Atacama a lot of groups visit Copa Coya just for the geysers and springs.  If you’re into hiking, skip the geysers and go for the hike.  You can always take a dip in the hot springs after the hike. Continue reading

Hiking King Peak in King Range Conservation Area

King Peak is the tallest mountain in the King Mountain Range.  At 4091 feet /1247 meters, it isn’t terribly tall.  But its got near enough to 3,000 feet of prominence (height from the ground the mountain is on to the top of the mountain), which makes it tall enough for me.

We took the Lightning Trail to the summit, but there are 2 other routes that you can take.  Probably more if you’re backpacking.  If you are doing it as a day hike I recommend Lightning.  The trail is well marked and fun.  After reaching the summit we took one of the alternative routes, King Crest North, for a couple of miles and found the going discouragingly slow.  Lots of fallen trees meant it was hard to maintain a stride.

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